The Final

July 7, 1974
Olympic Stadium, Munich, West Germany

 

HOLLAND 1  WEST GERMANY 2 (Half-time 1-2)


In the Final the two talented sides provided an exhibition of “Total Football”  which thrilled the 1 billion spectators around the world.  The Dutch were more skillful but the West Germans showed a determination to win that even Johan Cruijff could not dash.  It hardly seems possible for a match to have opened more dramatically as the Dutch were awarded a penalty after barely a minute’s play.  After Oranje had passed the ball around some twenty to thirty times, they forced the Germans deep into their own half.  But the Germans could not steal possession.  Finally Cruijff made a run into the penalty box where he was brought down by Hoeness.  Neeskens converted from the spot in the first ever penalty in a World Cup Final.  The Germans were losing without even having touched the ball. 

The Dutch were sure that they would win and they became overconfident, even arrogant.  While one half of the team wanted to crush the Germans, the other half wanted to toy with them, humiliate them and make them look ridiculous in front of their own crowd.  But the Germans shrugged aside adversity and in the 25th minute Hölzenbein made a long run towards the Dutch penalty area, Arie Haan did not pick him up forcing Wim Jansen to come from a long way out and make a sliding tackle.  The tackle was clean but Hölzenbein dove over Jansen and was awarded a penalty for his performance.  Breitner converted and all was equal.  Just before the half Bonhof  made a charge and found the ubiquitous Gerd Müller who scored a sly goal on the turn.  Jongbloed never the saw the ball coming.  It turned out to be Müller’s last international match and the goal made him the highest scorer in World Cup history.  Holland came back in the second half but the injuries sustained by Rijsbergen and Rensenbrink did not help their cause.  They were playing better and the equaliser

was hanging in the air.  But openings that were presented to Cruijff, Neeskens and Rep were not converted.  The Germans were simply holding out for the whistle as they were being outplayed at every end of the pitch.  But their resilience and determination paid off.  The minutes finally ran out and despite creating opportunities, Holland failed to score and consequently lost to a lesser team.  It was only their second defeat in 24 internationals.  It also turned out to be the first ever Final without a goal in the second half.

 

Holland: Jan Jongbloed, Wim Suurbier, Wim Rijsbergen (Theo de Jong), Arie Haan, Ruud Krol, Wim Jansen, Johan Neeskens, Wim van Hanegem, Johnny Rep, Johan Cruijff, Rob Rensenbrink (René van de Kerkhof)

Scorer: Neeskens (pen)

 

West Germany: Maier, Vogts, Schwarzenbeck, Beckenbauer, Breitner, Bonhof, Hoeness, Overath, Grabowski, Müller, Hölzenbein

Scorers: Breitner, Müller

The Final

July 7, 1974
Olympic Stadium, Munich, West Germany

 

NETHERLANDS 1  WEST GERMANY 2 (Half-time 1-2)


In the Final the two talented sides provided an exhibition of “Total Football”  which thrilled over a billion spectators all over the world.  The Dutch were more skillful but the West Germans had a determination to win that even Johan Cruijff could not stop.  It hardly seems possible for a match to have opened more dramatically as the Dutch were awarded a penalty after barely a minute’s play.  After Oranje had passed the ball around some twenty to thirty times, they forced the Germans deep into their own half.  But the Germans could not steal possession.  Finally Cruijff made a run into the penalty box where he was brought down by Hoeness.  Neeskens converted from the spot in the first ever penalty in a World Cup Final.  The Germans were losing without even having touched the ball. 

The Dutch were sure that they would win and they became overconfident, even arrogant.  While one half of the team wanted to crush the Germans, the other half wanted to toy with them, humiliate them and make them look ridiculous in front of their own crowd.  But the Germans shrugged aside adversity and in the 25th minute Hölzenbein made a long run towards the Dutch penalty area, Arie Haan did not pick him up forcing Wim Jansen to come from a long way out and make a sliding tackle.  The tackle was clean but Hölzenbein dove over Jansen and was awarded a penalty for his performance.  Breitner converted and all was equal.  Just before the half Bonhof  made a charge and found the ubiquitous Gerd Müller who scored a sly goal on the turn.  Jongbloed never the saw the ball coming.  It turned out to be Müller’s last international match and the goal made him the highest scorer in World Cup history.  Holland came back in the second

whistle as they were being outplayed at every end of the pitch.   But their resilience and determination paid off. The minutes finally ran out and despite creating opportunities, Holland failed to score and consequently lost to a lesser team.  It was only their second defeat in 24 internationals.  It also turned out to be the first ever Final without a goal in the second half.

 

Holland: Jan Jongbloed, Wim Suurbier, Wim Rijsbergen (Theo de Jong), Arie Haan, Ruud Krol, Wim Jansen, Johan Neeskens, Wim van Hanegem, Johnny Rep, Johan Cruijff, Rob Rensenbrink (René van de Kerkhof)

Scorer: Neeskens (pen)

 

West Germany: Maier, Vogts, Schwarzenbeck, Beckenbauer, Breitner, Bonhof, Hoeness, Overath, Grabowski, Müller, Hölzenbein

Scorers: Breitner, Müller

half but the injuries sustained by Rijsbergen and Rensenbrink did not help their cause.  They were playing better and the equaliser was hanging in the air.  But openings that were presented to Cruijff, Neeskens and Rep were not converted.  The Germans were simply holding out for the

Second Round - Match 2

July 3, 1974

Westfalen Stadium, Dortmund, West Germany

NETHERLANDS 2  BRAZIL 0 (Half-time 0-0)

 

This final second round match was dubbed as the Semi-Final as the winner would certainly be in the Final, even though Oranje only needed a draw.  It was the old giants against the new giants and Holland  was not only facing the defending champions, they were facing a legend.  Oranje had remained consistently brilliant in the tournament whereas Brazil had been improving along the way. 

The game was to be marred by violence, it was by far the most violent match of that World Cup and perhaps even in the history of the tournament.  Unfortunately, Brazil, who had played roughly in the first round, resorted to a series of ferocious tackles and violent plays from the very kick-off.  Within just two minutes the referee was forced to penalise them for three fouls.  The match broke down completely as it was clear that the Dutch were no angels either.  Rather than respond passively they dished out some rough treatment in retaliation.  But it was nothing compared to the nervous Brazilians who wanted to cling onto their title at all cost.  Ironically they would probably have had a better chance if they had just played

their normally beautiful brand of football.  Oranje played slightly better in the goalless first-half, where both teams missed some close shots.  But the second half was all Orange as the Dutch systematically exposed the Brazilian defence.  In the fiftieth minute Neeskens and Cruijff worked brilliantly together as Neeskens took Cruijff’s return and sliced the ball over the hapless keeper.  Finally the Brazilians focused on their attacking tactics as they needed two goals if they wanted to make it to the Final.  But when a leaping Cruijff volleyed home a Krol cross it was all over for Brazil.  Luis Perreira of Brazil was sent off six minutes from time for an outrageous high tackle on Neeskens which left him unconscious.  Additionally, five other Brazilians received yellow cards.  Brazil had relinquished their title and their positive reputation.  But Holland was in the Final of a major tournament for the first time.

Netherlands: Jan Jongbloed, Wim Suurbier, Wim Rijsbergen, Arie Haan, Ruud Krol, Wim Jansen, Johan Neeskens (Rinus Israël), Wim van Hanegem, Johnny Rep, Johan Cruijff, Rob Rensenbrink (Theo de Jong)

Scorers: Neeskens, Cruijff

 

Brazil: Leao, Zé, Maria, Luís Pereira, Mario Marinho, Francisco Marinho, Paulo Cesar Carpegiani, Rivelino, Dirceu, Paulo Cesar Lima (Mirandinha), Jairzinho, Valdomiro

Second Round - Match 1

July 7, 1974
Olympic Stadium, Munich, West Germany

 

July 3, 1974

Westfalen Stadium, Dortmund, West Germany

 

HOLLAND 2  BRAZIL 0 (Half-time 0-0)

 

This final second round match was dubbed as the Semi-Final as the winner would certainly be in the Final, even though Oranje only needed a draw.  It was the old giants against the new giants and Holland  was not only facing the defending champions, they were facing a legend.  Oranje had remained consistently brilliant in the tournament whereas Brazil had been improving along the way. 

 

The game was to be marred by violence, it was by far the most violent match of that World Cup and perhaps even in the history of the tournament.  Unfortunately, Brazil, who had played roughly in the first round, resorted to a series of ferocious tackles and violent plays from the very kick-off.  Within just two minutes the referee was forced to penalise them for three fouls.  The match broke down completely as it was clear that the Dutch were no angels either.  Rather than respond passively they dished out some rough treatment in retaliation.  But it was nothing compared to the nervous Brazilians who wanted to cling onto their title at all cost.  Ironically they would probably have had a better chance if they had just played their normally beautiful brand of football.  Oranje played slightly better in the goalless first-half, where both teams missed some close shots.  But the second half was all Orange as the Dutch systematically exposed the Brazilian defence.  In the fiftieth minute Neeskens and Cruijff worked brilliantly together as Neeskens took Cruijff’s return and sliced the ball over the hapless keeper.  Finally the Brazilians focused on their attacking tactics as they needed two goals if they wanted to make it to the Final.  But when a leaping Cruijff volleyed home a Krol cross it was all over for Brazil.  Luis Perreira of Brazil was sent off six minutes from time for an outrageous high tackle on Neeskens which left him unconscious.  Additionally, five other Brazilians received yellow cards.  Brazil had relinquished their title and their positive reputation.  But Holland was in the Final of a major tournament for the first time.

The Dutch were sure that they would win and they became overconfident, even arrogant.  While one half of the team wanted to crush the Germans, the other half wanted to toy with them, humiliate them and make them look ridiculous in front of their own crowd.  But the Germans shrugged aside adversity and in the 25th minute Hölzenbein made a long run towards the Dutch penalty area, Arie Haan did not pick him up forcing Wim Jansen to come from a long way out and make a sliding tackle.  The tackle was clean but Hölzenbein dove over Jansen and was awarded a penalty for his performance.  Breitner converted and all was equal.  Just before the half Bonhof  made a charge and found the ubiquitous Gerd Müller who scored a sly goal on the turn.  Jongbloed never the saw the ball coming.  It turned out to be Müller’s last international match and the goal made him the highest scorer in World Cup history.  Holland came back in the second half but the injuries sustained by Rijsbergen and Rensenbrink did not help their cause.  They were playing better and the equaliser

was hanging in the air.  But openings that were presented to Cruijff, Neeskens and Rep were not converted.  The Germans were simply holding out for the whistle as they were being outplayed at every end of the pitch.  But their resilience and determination paid off.  The minutes finally ran out and despite creating opportunities, Holland failed to score and consequently lost to a lesser team.  It was only their second defeat in 24 internationals.  It also turned out to be the first ever Final without a goal in the second half.

 

Holland: Jan Jongbloed, Wim Suurbier, Wim Rijsbergen (Theo de Jong), Arie Haan, Ruud Krol, Wim Jansen, Johan Neeskens, Wim van Hanegem, Johnny Rep, Johan Cruijff, Rob Rensenbrink (René van de Kerkhof)

Scorer: Neeskens (pen)

 

West Germany: Maier, Vogts, Schwarzenbeck, Beckenbauer, Breitner, Bonhof, Hoeness, Overath, Grabowski, Müller, Hölzenbein

Scorers: Breitner, Müller

This website is based on the updated content found in the books Voetbal van Oranje and Cijfers van Oranje by Thomas Snyder, © 1996 & 2000.

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